We took some time out with the creative artists from this issue of Waylines. Through their own words, find out the story behind their stories.

David Karlak
DIRECTOR OF "THE CANDIDATE"

What was the inspiration behind The Candidate, the story behind the story?  

The inspiration behind THE CANDIDATE was wanting to create a modern take on the voodoo trope. I came across a voodoo-themed short story by the same title written by Henry Selsar in 1961 and thought it was the perfect springboard for a contemporary adaptation.

What was the production like for The Candidate? How long did all this take?  

THE CANDIDATE was shot in Downtown LA over the course of 5 days. Brandon Cox was the director of photography and together we decided that shooting on 35mm anamorphic would service the story and achieve the tone I wated. The film was predominantly shot on dolly. Everything was storyboarded and the actors arrive to set rehearsed. I was fortunate enough to get everything within 3-5 takes and we averaged 35 set-ups a day.
David Karlak
How big of a crew did it take to achieve The Candidate? Are there any juicy production tales you'd like to talk about?  

The crew consisted of about 30 people. In terms of juicy production anecdotes... there’s a final scene that we shot that didn’t end up making it into the final cut that took place in the midst of a marathon. For the scene, we shot in downtown LA during the LA marathon, and because of the time restrictions and cost, we elected to shoot without a permit. While we were shooting this scene guerellia-style, I was slightly nervous because we were just feet away from the police tent and Tom Gulager (Burton Grunzer) was the only dude wearing a suit and tie in a sea of running shorts and sneakers. When the police confronted us, we just told them we were shooting a documentary, and I guess they bought it.

What are you currently working on?  

I’m currently working on RISE at Warner Bros. and OUTLIERS at Fox. Both are based on original pitches/ideas of mine and I’m attached to direct both. Marcus Dunstan and Patrick Melton are writing the screenplays. Both projects are hard science-fiction.



WE HAVE MORE WE ASKED DAVID. FOR THE COMPLETE INTERVIEW, PLEASE CHECK OUT WAYLINES DIGITAL DOWNLOAD EDITION.

Anaea Lay
AUTHOR OF "A LONG FUSE TO A SLOW DETONATION"
How did you come up A Long Fuse to a Slow Detonation? What stages did you go through in the process of getting the idea down?

I was in an extraordinarily bad mood and had the first few lines of the story in my head, so I sat down to make fictional people miserable. A couple hours later I had the story. I probably spent the most revision time on the paragraph with all the fucks. I wanted to try getting it in there as an infix, but everything I tried destroyed the rhythm, so I gave up on that particular dream. I'll have to in-fucking-fix some other time.

Why write? Surely there are so many other, far easier, things you could be doing?

Writing isn't hard, and it's a great deal of fun. I'm not one of those writers who has to pry every word out of their soul with an ice pick, or who's overcome with shame
 
and self-loathing when faced with their work. Intellectually I can understand why those writers keep writing, but viscerally I find it utterly confounding. If I'm writing, it's because there really isn't anything more compelling for me to do at the moment. Besides, it's the only way I know of to commit murder or end the world without exerting a great deal of effort and risking an expensive, time-consuming trial.

What are you working on at the moment? Where can our readers find more Anaea Lay?

At the moment I'm drafting a novel about a woman with two boyfriends who is the first of the women in her family who doesn't see glimpses of her future, and the ways these things interact when she moves home to take care of her elderly grandmother. For short work, I've started creeping up in a lot of places. I have a story coming out in Lightspeed early next year (Salamander Patterns) that's probably the happiest ending I've ever written, though I think the ending of my story in Daily Science Fiction last October (Doomsday Will Come With Flame) was pretty cheerful, too. Then again, I've been known to utter the line, "It's okay, there's problem solving through cannibalism at the end," so my concept of cheerful might be off.

If you're looking for me, and not just my work, I natter on quite a bit at my blog, which I love more than it warrants.




WE HAVE MORE WE ASKED ANAEA. FOR THE COMPLETE INTERVIEW, PLEASE CHECK OUT WAYLINES DIGITAL DOWNLOAD EDITION.

Andrew S. Williams
AUTHOR OF "BEST REGARDS"
How did you come up Best Regards? What stages did you go through in the process of getting the idea down?

Working in tech support for a major I.T. company, I have the modern-day equivalent of Garrin's job. The e-mails I send out tend to be fairly repetitive and full of corporate doublespeak, so it felt ripe for parody. And even though this type of parody has certainly been done before, I hoped that by telling everything from the perspective of the support guy, and intertwining disparate story threads into one cohesive whole while keeping the reader laughing, I could put my own unique spin on the idea.

I usually don't outline short stories, but I needed to for this one, so I could easily have a bird's-eye view of the different arcs. I would use the outline to determine what each e-mail needed to say, then switch to the main story document and focus on the wordsmithing of each one individually.
 


The story is shot through with dark humor, and a few touches of the absurd. Why do you find yourself drawn to this style? What other themes do you find yourself exploring in your work?

Laughter is one of my favorite emotions to evoke in a story, because I love having a chuckle when I read. My sense of humor tends to be very dry and sardonic—possibly the result of growing up with a British Dad—so that's usually the kind of comedy I write.

I find the kind of humor that works best in prose fiction isn't line-by-line jokes; it's building on previous context, and establishing story elements then using them later in unexpected ways. In the case of "Best Regards," it's also introducing common elements that the reader will recognize (dealing with modern tech; or the interactions between a grown-up son and his mother; or even old sci-fi tropes, like Evil Twins) and combining them in bizarre ways, so the reader sees their own experience reflected it what is otherwise a completely absurd situation.

Whether I'm writing humor or not, I definitely think the best fiction illuminates some part of the real world.


What are you working on at the moment? Where can our readers find more Andrew S. Williams?

A flash fiction story I wrote called "Natalie" is appearing in the November 2013 issue of Lakeside Circus (the debut issue)! For those who like alt-history stories with a mythological flair—pretty much the opposite of "Best Regards"—I've also been in two recent anthologies edited by Eric J. Guignard, one of which was a final nominee for this year's Bram Stoker Award. You can check out my full bibliography at http://offthewrittenpath.com/writing.



WE HAVE LOADS MORE WE ASKED ANDREW. FOR THE COMPLETE INTERVIEW, PLEASE CHECK OUT WAYLINES DIGITAL DOWNLOAD EDITION.